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Why are they called canine teeth?

Why are they called canine teeth?

When you hear the word canine, you likely picture a dog, not a tooth. So, why do they have the same name? In fact, what is the origin of all your teeth’s names?

 

Canines1

It’s no coincidence that these pointed teeth are named after dogs. They are called canines due to their resemblance to a dog’s fangs. While our canine teeth aren’t as long, pronounced or sharp as a dog’s, they are usually longer and more pointed than our other human teeth. Canines are sometimes referred to as eye teeth because of their alignment under the eyes.

 

Incisors2

Incisors are the front teeth on both your upper and lower jaws. Because their primary purpose is to bite into food, their name came from the Latin word “incidere,” which means cutter.

 

Molars3

Like incisors, molars are named after the function they perform. Molar is based on the Latin word “mola,” which means millstone. Just as a mill grinds grain into meal, molars — located near the back of your mouth — grind food.

For many people, an extra set of molars (commonly known as wisdom teeth) emerges around age 17 or later. Because wisdom teeth are the last to appear, their name is derived from the belief that we grow wiser with age.[4]

 

Premolars5

As you may have already guessed, premolars are named for their alignment just in front of molars. Premolars are sometimes called bicuspids, due to the fact that they have two points or cusps.

 

Sources:

1 https://www.colgate.com/en-us/oral-health/basics/mouth-and-teeth-anatomy/what-is-a-canine-tooth-

2 https://www.dictionary.com/browse/incisor

3 https://www.dictionary.com/browse/molars

4 https://www.mouthhealthy.org/en/az-topics/w/wisdom-teeth?_ga=2.128297995.602462214.1552926316-1156569257.1552684026

5 https://www.colgate.com/en-us/oral-health/basics/mouth-and-teeth-anatomy/the-truth-about-premolars-0313

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